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Friday, December 13

  1. page Climate Change Pacing Quarter 1 edited ... Science Fair Materials: Hort UDI Unit 2 Science Fair Research Manual {Hort UDI Unit 2.docx} …
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    Science Fair Materials:
    Hort UDI Unit 2 Science Fair Research Manual {Hort UDI Unit 2.docx}
    Science Fair Research Manual {Science Fair Research Manual.pdf}
    Tips to Edit Your Paper CPS Science Fiar Paper Arrangement {Tips to Edit Your Paper.docx}
    CPS Science Fair Paper Arrangement {CPS Science Fair Paper Arrangement.pdf}
    (view changes)
    8:02 am

Saturday, April 20

  1. page Semester 2 SY2013-2013 edited ... Building a Biome Teacher Guide {Building a Biome Teacher Guide.pdf} Building a Biome PowerPo…
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    Building a Biome Teacher Guide {Building a Biome Teacher Guide.pdf}
    Building a Biome PowerPoint {Building a Biome.pptx}
    Bell Ringer:
    1.What are the two factors that define a biome? Provide specific examples of biomes.
    2.What is the difference between deciduous and coniferous forests?
    Review Project Expectations (Objectives) and Relevance
    ...
    a hypothesis
    •Differentiate

    •Differentiate
    independent and dependent variables
    •Evaluate

    •Evaluate
    the results
    ...
    an experiment
    •Explain

    •Explain
    a conceptual
    ...
    surface features
    •Describe

    •Describe
    strengths and
    ...
    physical models
    Jigsaw Overview Section from Student Guide
    In groups of 4, assign each portion of the Overview.
    ...
    How much precipitation does this biome receive annually?
    What kind of vegetation (plants) are found in this biome?
    Wrap-up Discussion
    Day 3
    Bell Ringer Questions:
    What are the two factors that define a climate?
    What are the two factors that define a biome?
    What term refers to the measure of the reflectivity of Earth’s surface?
    How do dark and light surface features change the amount of reflectivity?
    Review Biome Lab Expectations (methods - student guide page 4)
    Experimental Design Question:
    How much of each colored material should be used to represent your biome?
    You will build models that represent the same amount of different colored areas that are on the Biome Vegetation Map.
    Refer to the list of available materials and consider the following questions:
    •Which materials will be appropriate for your biome?
    •Is the color of the materials that you choose important for your model?
    •How much of each color will you use in your model?
    Review the list of responsibilities for each team member (student guide page 8). Take two minutes and decide who will be the:
    •Lead Researcher
    •Materials and Data Manager
    •Experimental Communicator
    Students complete: •Experimental Design Proposal; handout pages 9 - 10
    Wrap-up discussion
    Days 4-5
    Bell Ringer:
    1.Does is matter if a planet has an atmosphere or has no atmosphere?
    2.What kind of effect might an atmosphere have on surface temperature? Why? Write it down.
    Once you have written your thoughts down discuss them with a partner. Be prepared to discuss your thoughts with the class.
    Outline purpose of experimentation:
    teams will conduct experiments to test these two questions:
    1)Does an atmosphere influence the temperature of a planet system?
    2)How do the different biomes influence the temperature of a planet system? You will create a physical model for your biome, one with an atmosphere and one without on which to conduct your experiment.
    Allow students time to conduct their two models. Have various materials and small plastic containers available for them to use.
    Over the next two class periods: students carried out their proposed experimental procedure, making adjustments when necessary. If time allows, encourage students to repeat their test.
    Each pair or small group shares their findings with the rest of the class. The data is displayed and students create histograms outlining all of the findings from the biome investigation. (graphs can be summatively assessed)
    Day 6
    Bell Ringer: Was their anything surprising about your results? Explain, using specific evidence from your graphs.
    Facilitated class discussion of two sample graphs from two different models. Analysis questions:
    These graphs represent the data for an experiment. Compare the data for the two model situations (atmosphere/no atmosphere).
    How does an atmosphere seem to have affected the temperature in the models? Are the results similar to yours? Explain.
    Allow students time to complete the Individual Analysis Questions with their small groups.
    Class discussion: the Strengths and Limitations of Physical Models
    1.What are the strengths and limitations of physical models?
    2.How well do you think physical models simulate the actual temperature differences found on planets with a thin atmosphere compared to those with a thick atmosphere?
    3.What could be changed in the physical models so that they could better simulate the Earth?
    (following class period)
    Assessment: Building a Biome Quiz
    1.How did the presence of an atmosphere on the models influence the temperature of the biomes represented?
    2.In what ways does a thick atmosphere affect the Earth system?
    3.In what ways do the world’s biomes effect Earth’s temperature? Be specific.
    4.What is the term that describes the reflectivity of Earth’s surface features?
    5.Why should we not solely rely on physical models to understand a certain aspect of the environment?

    Biosphere
    Rainforest in Crisis Lesson
    (view changes)
    11:00 am
  2. page Semester 2 SY2013-2013 edited ... What did you do well in this debate? What do you want to improve the next time you participat…
    ...
    What did you do well in this debate?
    What do you want to improve the next time you participate in a debate like this?
    Day 1
    Building a Biome Student Guide {Building a Biome Student Guide.pdf}
    Building a Biome Teacher Guide {Building a Biome Teacher Guide.pdf}
    Building a Biome PowerPoint {Building a Biome.pptx}
    Bell Ringer:
    1.What are the two factors that define a biome? Provide specific examples of biomes.
    2.What is the difference between deciduous and coniferous forests?
    Review Project Expectations (Objectives) and Relevance
    •Design an experiment to answer a specific question and test a hypothesis
    •Differentiate independent and dependent variables
    •Evaluate the results and suggest modifications to an experiment
    •Explain a conceptual relationship between temperature, energy inputs and surface features
    •Describe strengths and limitations of physical models
    Jigsaw Overview Section from Student Guide
    In groups of 4, assign each portion of the Overview.
    Student 1: paragraphs 1-2
    Student 2: paragraphs 3-4
    Student 3: paragraphs 5-6
    Student 4: paragraphs 7-9
    Each student will have 1 minute to share the most relevant information from their assigned paragraphs with the rest of the group.
    Wrap-up Discussion: Review groups of biomes and expected investigate questions.
    Day 2
    Bell Ringer: How could the color of Earth’s surface features impact the temperature of the biome?
    Bonus question: What is the term for this phenomenon?
    Review the concept of ALBEDO (visual diagrams)
    Introduce World Vegetation Map
    Preliminary Activity: Engagement (Teacher guide pages 3-4)
    Assign student groups ONE of the six major terrestrial biomes along with a color copy of the world vegetation map (in sheet protector).
    Students use iPads to examine and identify specific characteristics of their assigned biome.
    Students trace areas where they think their biome is located onto the map.
    Students present their findings to class (Informal presentation) - Each group is encouraged to justify their selections.
    What are the geographic locations of your biome?
    What is the temperature range for this biome?
    How much precipitation does this biome receive annually?
    What kind of vegetation (plants) are found in this biome?

    Biosphere
    Rainforest in Crisis Lesson
    (view changes)
    10:45 am
  3. page Semester 2 SY2013-2013 edited ... Class discussion and review (formative assessment) Video (discussion): Flask Sampling on Maun…
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    Class discussion and review (formative assessment)
    Video (discussion): Flask Sampling on Mauna Loa Observatory.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHkfCsFnHLI
    Active Listening Reading and Annotating with a partner:
    Large Volcanic Eruptions Help Plants Absorb More CO2 from the Atmosphere {Large Volcanic Eruptions Help Plants Absorb More Carbon Dioxide From the Atmosphere.docx}
    ...
    Day 6
    Bell Ringer: What is the purpose of a debate?
    Review debate debate protocol and{Debate protocols.doc} and rubrics (students
    Introduce debate question:
    Do you think that large volcanic eruptions INCREASE plant productivity? OR
    ...
    plant productivity?
    Materials needed:
    soft, medium-sized ball
    ...
    9. If two students really disagree with each other, however, they may toss the ball back and forth between each other to argue the point: they must pass the ball on to someone else, however, after a maximum of three back-and-forths, and they may not reenter the debate for another 5 minutes. (The facilitator may modify or forbid this, as appropriate/needed.)
    10. At the end of the debate, the facilitator poses 1-2 summing-up questions (see sample list below). Depending on the instructions given by the teacher or facilitator, students may pass the ball around the circle and answer the question(s) orally, answer in writing in their interactive civics notebooks, or answer first in writing and then volunteer to share their written answers orally. At least 5 minutes should be reserved by the teacher for this portion of the activity.
    Reflection:
    Which side do you agree with?
    How have your views changed as a result of participating in this debate? (provide specific evidence)
    How would you summarize the debate if you were telling a friend or family member about it?
    What did you do well in this debate?
    What do you want to improve the next time you participate in a debate like this?

    Biosphere
    Rainforest in Crisis Lesson
    (view changes)
    10:31 am
  4. 10:28 am
  5. page Semester 2 SY2013-2013 edited ... 2.How did this volcanic eruption impact photosynthesis? How does the evidence from the cross-s…
    ...
    2.How did this volcanic eruption impact photosynthesis? How does the evidence from the cross-section lead you to this conclusion?
    Day 4
    ...
    for a DebateDebate: Volcanic Eruptions and CO2 {Volcanic Eruptions and CO2 .pptx}
    Bell Ringer: What is the greenhouse effect?
    Class discussion and review (formative assessment)
    ...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHkfCsFnHLI
    Active Listening Reading and Annotating with a partner:
    ...
    the Atmosphere
    Large
    {Large Volcanic Eruptions Help Plants Absorb More Carbon Dioxide From the Atmosphere.docx}
    Large
    Volcanic Eruptions
    ...
    “Greener Greenhouse {Large Volcanic Eruptions Affect the Greener Greenhouse.docx}
    Active Reading/Listening Protocol:
    Person 1 (or 2) reads the first page of the reading while the other person annotates and underlines specific evidence to answer the focus question: How do large volcanic eruptions impact the greenhouse effect?
    ...
    Day 5
    Same protocol with second article.
    ...
    Review the two two graphs previously{Mt Pinatubo CO2 graphs over time.docx} previously analyzed to
    ...
    on Wednesday.
    Day 6
    Bell Ringer: What is the purpose of a debate?
    Review debate protocol and rubrics (students should be encouraged to use evidence from both articles as well as the graphs to support their claims made during the debate)
    Introduce debate question:
    Do you think that large volcanic eruptions INCREASE plant productivity? OR
    Do you think that large volcanic eruptions DECREASE plant productivity?
    Materials needed:
    soft, medium-sized ball
    plastic or Styrofoam cups (optional)
    debate topic/question
    copies of the “ Sentence Stems {Debate Sentence Stems.docx} ” and “ Active Listening Questions {Active Listening Questions.docx} ” lists – each student is provided a copy to use during the debate
    Room set-up: desks arranged in a large circle
    Special roles: Facilitator (at beginning of year, will be teacher; as year progresses, students should take over)
    Protocol:
    1. The facilitator introduces the topic for debate, lets students know how much time is available for the debate, reviews the rules/protocol, and reminds students to use the “sentence stems” and “questions to ask yourself” lists.
    2. If using cups, cups are distributed and students place a cup upright on their desk.
    3. The facilitator tosses the ball to the first person who wants to speak on the topic, and the debate begins.
    4. Only one person may speak at a time: namely, the person who is holding the ball
    5. Students may speak for a maximum of 90 seconds while they have the ball
    6. Students who wish to speak should raise their hands (or turn over a cup on their desk): when the first speaker has finished making her point, she tosses the ball to one of the students who has their hands raised (or cup turned over)
    7. Students who have a point of immediate relevance/importance may indicate that by raising their hand and raising their index finger in their air, or by placing their cups sideways on their desk (or by tapping them once on the desk when they turn them over)
    8. In general, students who have not yet spoken have precedence for receiving the ball over those who have already spoken
    9. If two students really disagree with each other, however, they may toss the ball back and forth between each other to argue the point: they must pass the ball on to someone else, however, after a maximum of three back-and-forths, and they may not reenter the debate for another 5 minutes. (The facilitator may modify or forbid this, as appropriate/needed.)
    10. At the end of the debate, the facilitator poses 1-2 summing-up questions (see sample list below). Depending on the instructions given by the teacher or facilitator, students may pass the ball around the circle and answer the question(s) orally, answer in writing in their interactive civics notebooks, or answer first in writing and then volunteer to share their written answers orally. At least 5 minutes should be reserved by the teacher for this portion of the activity.

    Biosphere
    Rainforest in Crisis Lesson
    (view changes)
    10:20 am
  6. 9:52 am

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